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Hendrik Scholte

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Scholte married Maria Kranz (AKA Mareah) in 1846. Shortly after the birth and death of their first son, Scholte, his wife, his three daughters, and his congregation emigrated to America in 1847. Scholte and his family traveled in style on the steamship ''Calidonia'', reaching Boston after a 13 day journey. Their 900 fellow immigrants travelled on four much slower, less comfortable sailing ships that took about 2 months to cross the ocean, reaching Baltimore in late May and early June 1847.
 
Scholte married Maria Kranz (AKA Mareah) in 1846. Shortly after the birth and death of their first son, Scholte, his wife, his three daughters, and his congregation emigrated to America in 1847. Scholte and his family traveled in style on the steamship ''Calidonia'', reaching Boston after a 13 day journey. Their 900 fellow immigrants travelled on four much slower, less comfortable sailing ships that took about 2 months to cross the ocean, reaching Baltimore in late May and early June 1847.
   
The entire group then traveled by road, railway, and riverboat to St. Louis, where they settled temporarily. Led by Scholte, the leaders traveled to south central Iowa, where they purchased 18,000 acres of farm land for $1.25 per acre and contracted to have log cabins built on this land for the settlers. The majority of the group, about 600, arrived to settle Pella, Iowa, on August 26, 1847, and found that, not surprisingly, the log cabins had not been built. They built temporary shelters by digging depressions in the soil and building temporary walls and roofs from whatever material they could find, often using sod. The remainder of the group arrived in spring of 1848. The immigrants lost about 150 members between leaving the Netherlands and finally reaching Pella.
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The entire group then traveled by road, railway, and riverboat to St. Louis, where they settled temporarily. Led by Scholte, the leaders traveled to northwest Iowa, where they purchased 18,000 acres of farm land for $1.25 per acre and contracted to have log cabins built on this land for the settlers. The majority of the group, about 600, arrived to settle Pella, Iowa, on August 26, 1847, and found that, not surprisingly, the log cabins had not been built. They built temporary shelters by digging depressions in the soil and building temporary walls and roofs from whatever material they could find, often using sod. The remainder of the group arrived in spring of 1848. The immigrants lost about 150 members between leaving the Netherlands and finally reaching Pella.
 
==Building Pella==
 
==Building Pella==
   
Hendrik and Maria had nine children (one died in infancy in the Netherlands), but only four - Henry, David, Dora, and another daughter - survived infancy. Only Henry and these two daughters married and had children, continuing the family tree to the present day.
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Hendrik and Maria had eight children, but only three - Henry, David, and Dora - survived infancy.
   
Scholte provided leadership in the colony's early years. He not only was the pastor of its nondenominational Calvinist congregation, but also served as the overall leader of the colony. Scholte laid out a plat of the town, chose names for the streets and avenues, and built up the Christian Church of Pella. He took care of legal affairs and started a lime and brick kiln as well as a sawmill. Scholte opened a bank and established a newspaper. He became the postmaster, the notary, and the land agent. In addition, he served on the college board, was a school inspector, and became active in local and national politics, even attending the inauguration of Abraham Lincoln.
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Scholte provided leadership in the colony's early years. He not only was the pastor of its nondenominational Calvinist congregtion, but also served as the overall leader of the colony. Scholte laid out a plat of the town, chose names for the streets and avenues, and built up the Christian Church of Pella. He took care of legal affairs and started a lime and brick kiln as well as a sawmill. Scholte opened a bank and established a newspaper. He became the postmaster, the notary, and the land agent. In addition, he served on the college board, was a school inspector, and became active in local and national politics, even attending the inauguration of Abraham Lincoln.
   
 
However, everything did not go smoothly in Pella, and Scholte was suspended from preaching in 1854. He thus founded the Second Christian Church of Pella, where he preached until he died. The new congregation lasted about one year after that. (A third Pella congregation, called the Dutch Reformed Church was formed in 1856, and soon united with the [[Reformed Church in America]]. A second Dutch Reformed congregation was organized in 1862, this one worshiping in English instead of Dutch.)
 
However, everything did not go smoothly in Pella, and Scholte was suspended from preaching in 1854. He thus founded the Second Christian Church of Pella, where he preached until he died. The new congregation lasted about one year after that. (A third Pella congregation, called the Dutch Reformed Church was formed in 1856, and soon united with the [[Reformed Church in America]]. A second Dutch Reformed congregation was organized in 1862, this one worshiping in English instead of Dutch.)
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