Dutch Refo…

Editing

Hendrik Scholte

1
  • The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit. If you are undoing an edit that is …
Latest revision Your text
Line 14: Line 14:
   
 
==Secession==
 
==Secession==
Under Dutch law, the Reformed Church had been the only recognized Protestant denomination since the 1814 Constitution, which allowed for religious freedom - but only when applied to existing denomination. Under the Napoleanic Code, Seceeders were not allowed to hold meetings with more than 20 people without state permission.
+
Scholte figured prominently among a small group of Calvinist clergy who broke away from the ''Hervormde Kerk'' as part of a spiritual awakening that culminated in the ''Afscheiding'' (Secession) of 1834. Under Dutch law, the seceeders were not allowed to hold meetings with more than 20 people.
   
Scholte was the leader of a small group of orthodox Calvinist clergy, including [[Albertus van Raalte]] and Anthonie van Brummelkamp, that refused to compromise with the liberal Reformed Church. Issues came to a head when [[Hendrik de Cock]] and his Ulrum congregation publicly seceded from the Reformed Church in 1834, bringing about the ''Afscheiding'' (Secession) of 1834
+
The Seceders' initial efforts to gain recognition for their free church movement met stiff state opposition. Scholte's civil disobedience earned him fines and court costs totaling $3,200 as well as an 18-month prison sentence in 1834, although he was soon released on bond. Scholte wanted a Reformed church independent of government oversight and was the first to adopt the name ''Christelijk Afgescheiden Gemeente'' (Seceeded Christian Church), which was given to his Utrach congregation in 1838. Even though persecution gave way to reluctant tolerance by the Dutch government, Seceders continued to struggle under social ostracism, economic boycotts, and job discrimination.
 
The Seceders' initial efforts to gain recognition met strong state opposition. Scholte's civil disobedience had earned him fines as well as an 18-month prison sentence, although he was released on bond. Scholte wanted a Reformed church independent of government oversight and was the first to adopt the name ''Christelijk Afgescheiden Gemeente'' (Seceeded Christian Church), which was given to his Utrech congregation in 1838. Even though persecution eventually gave way to reluctant tolerance by the Dutch government, Seceders continued to struggle under social ostracism, economic boycotts, and job discrimination.
 
   
 
After much deliberation, Scholte concluded In the spring of 1846 that emigration to the United States offered Seceders the only meaningful chance for religious liberty and economic opportunity. The group did considerable planning and chose Iowa as their destination. They also decided to name their “City of Refuge” Pella.
 
After much deliberation, Scholte concluded In the spring of 1846 that emigration to the United States offered Seceders the only meaningful chance for religious liberty and economic opportunity. The group did considerable planning and chose Iowa as their destination. They also decided to name their “City of Refuge” Pella.
 
 
==Immigration==
 
==Immigration==
   
  Loading editor
Below are some commonly used wiki markup codes. Simply click on what you want to use and it will appear in the edit box above.

View this template